Tag Archives: Red Bird Crest Trail

In it for the fun . . .

I’d been contacted a few weeks back by John from the Atlanta-area. We met in 2013 while riding at Red Bird with Charlie and Steve from Indy. I had served as their “guide” around the loop that day and most all of the group made it intact.  That was a good day but unfortunately the weekend ended on a bad note. [Click here to read more about that adventure]

John and his friends Tom, also from Atlanta, and Tim, from down in Pensacola, Florida had a half-week of riding planned. Their itinerary started with a day in Georgia, one in Tennessee, another at Red Bird, and the final day with Jesse and I at our riding area. The forecast had looked great for many days but it turned to hell in hurry. By the week’s end, there was a 90% chance of rain for the area and it had been raining steadily down that way all week long. Saturated is the term that comes to mind.

I touched based with John and he said they rode part of the Red Bird loop in the rain on Friday and were up for more “in the rain” riding on Saturday. Ok. It was a go. We were going to ride rain or shine! John said they were ready for an adventure and Philip commented they were going to the right place!

Tom (GasGas) & Tim (KTM) Riding Red Bird in the Rain
Tom (GasGas) & Tim (KTM) Riding Red Bird in the Rain

The plan was to meet at 9am but I was up and out of the house early. On the way down I noticed the nice, neat rows of golf carts that Kevin had lined up at the golf course. If folks were going to play golf in the rain, then we could surely handle riding in it. It was drizzling at the house and it rained on and off most of the way. But, when I pulled into park at 8:30am it was barely misting. Good deal.

Ready to go!
Ready to go!

I unloaded my bike and put it inside to keep the seat dry and got all my gear on. The forecast called for “numerous showers” and a high in the low to mid-50’s. It was 48 when I turned off the truck. I made the decision at that time to not wear my Klim Traverse pants as honestly, I knew they’d be too hot with the level of exertion that I’d likely experience. But my Klim Traverse jacket was a different story, that was the perfect day for putting it to the test once again. It was loaded up with d3o pads in the shoulders and elbows, the back vent was fully opened, the underarm vents were unzipped about 3 inches, and the pockets were stuffed with spare gloves, batteries, paper towels, and other essentials for the day.

The “Southern Crew” showed up right on time and Jesse was not far behind. David stopped by as we were getting ready and got to meet everyone. That was good. We all appreciate the opportunity to ride where we do.

Tom and Tim at the Staging Area
Tom and Tim at the Staging Area

Things got better as when we rolled out, it was not raining. There were no breaks in the clouds, but at least it was not actively precipitating. Yes! This was much better than I’d anticipated.

As we made our way along the trails I noticed how dark it was. Some of the valleys are deep and there just wasn’t much light. A fresh layer of leaves was covering the ground and obscuring most little obstacles like rocks, roots, and logs. The kinda stuff that’ll grab your front wheel and throw you to ground. Caution was the name of the game. Below is a clip of some trail we rode before first break.

We made our first stop around 2.5 miles into the initial loop so I could see how everyone was doing and make sure they were pleased with the pace and trails. All seemed to be good. They really liked what they’d ridden so far and were ready for some more. By the way, we learned at this stop that John was running a new style Yamaha front fender on his “real” Husky WR250. I’d never noticed if he hadn’t brought it up. What happened to his stock front fender? Still no rain.

Our First Break
Our First Break

A notable section of the first loop was our drop into one of the rock-littered, slick-bottomed, washed-out creek beds we like to ride. It is like a jungle down there in the summer with all the lush vegetation. This was one of the first really technical sections we tackled and everyone enjoyed the challenge! Here’s a little video clip of the descent.

We made it back to the staging area around 11:30 with over 13 miles on my trusty Trail Tech odometer. Within a couple minutes, it started raining. Not really hard, but enough that it would not be fun to ride in. The group sat in the dry barn, ate some lunch, and did some bench racing. All of sudden, the sound of rain hitting the metal roof started to subside so we got our stuff together and headed out on the trail once again. Great timing!

The second outing included a small loop on the south side of the property and a decent sized loop on the north end. Both of these included some fun “goat trails” that were a little more interesting due to the wet conditions. I just wanted to make sure these guys got to enjoy some of the more technical stuff. The video clip below from Tom shows a portion of what we call the “Cat Cave Hill” goat trail.

Onward! Still no rain! This was good. Their plan was to be on the road and southbound towards Atlanta no later than 3pm and we were on track to make that happen. I don’t blame them for wanting to get home at a reasonable hour.

I made sure to hit the new switchback downhill and the tight single track up the main creek on the north end and rounded out the loop with the primary goat trail above “the bowl”. There was 21.55 miles showing on my odometer when I pushed the bike up into the truck. Not bad for a nasty-wet day, and based on some commentary, they were more than pleased with the whole experience. Something tells me our friends will be back for another adventure!

One more note about the Klim Traverse jacket . . . that is one awesome piece of gear. It is so tough and perfect for all the briar and branches we endure and although I did get a little warm, my upper body was dry and comfortable. Gore-tex is a wonderful material and Klim knows how to incorporate it into their higher-end gear. You can ride anytime of the year as long as you have the right gear and can get motivated to get out in the nasty elements!

A special thanks to the Southern Crew for having nice quiet 2-strokes and for appreciating the riding opportunity. John provided the photos, Tom contributed some video, and Tim entertained Jesse while he struggled with the MotoZ Mountain Hybrid on the gnarly Kentucky terrain. Great Times!

I’d venture to say that not many folks would have loaded up on a rainy day with a 90% chance of rain to go ride. You really have to enjoy the promise of an adventure and truly be “in it for the fun”. We could have just sat at home but where’s the fun and adventure in that?

See you on the trail!

Taken for Granted . . .

I’ve been riding motorcycles since I was in 4th grade . . . 1976 was the year I started. During that nearly 4 decade period, things have changed significantly. In the early days, I remember us having plenty of places to go and ride. There were trails in the Daniel Boone National Forest, private farms or wooded properties, some pipeline areas, and even empty lots in and around the neighborhoods where I lived.

This Way!
This Way!

Today, only a very small fraction of these places are open for riding. The Forest Service has shut down essentially all trails except for the Red Bird Crest Trail loop. There are some other areas that are open but many are dead end, one way trails that are less than 10 miles in length. No one wants to drive an hour or more to just ride a 10 mile trail. As for private properties, the fear of litigation has stopped all that type of access and riding in residential areas was nixed due to disrespectful actions and idiots who think that louder = faster.

Don’t get me wrong here . . . I too have been “one of those” annoying characters. I’ve drag raced my uncorked IT125 down a residential street with Travis, ridden without the appropriate protective gear, ventured off the designated Forest Service Trail, and stirred up excessive dust and dirt with no respect for those in close proximity. Most of this occurred during my teenage years and even as a young adult.

Don't Take It For Granted!
Don’t Take It For Granted!

Over a long period of time, a broad range of experiences in a wide variety of settings has totally changed my perception of motorized recreation. First of all, if you take the places where you can ride for granted you will lose them. This is especially true in cases where the trail system is of mixed use. That is, the trail system is shared with hikers, mountain bikers, horses, and motorcycles.

Mixed Use Trailhead Signage
Mixed Use Trailhead Signage

In a mixed use trail situation, the motorcyclist is the lowest on the totem pole. You must yield to all other users. It is a matter of respect and simple etiquette. Shut off your bike and if possible move it to the side so that the other trail users can easily get around. Smile, say hello, apologize for interrupting their outing, and make sure they know how many more riders are in your party. Inquire as to how their day is going and if you are carrying a saw (someone in your party should be), ask them if there are any trees down across the trail ahead and let them know that you’ll remove them accordingly. Doing all this goes a very long way to earning the respect of non-motorized trail users.

Trail Courtesy
Trail Courtesy

I have personally witnessed situations where motorcyclists (and even mountain bikers) have not stopped and just blown past a group of hikers or horse riders. This is not an effective way to win friends or garner support for mixed use trails. Frankly, it just pisses them off and gives them the ammunition they need to totally shut down motorized access. Could you really blame them? No one is entitled to act in that manner.

Honestly, there are very few off road riders that have been taught these values. I suspect there are more out West than back East and this is evidenced by the abundance of trails that permit motorized use. Regardless, it is a problem and there are no indications that it is getting any better.

If you want to ride at race pace, roost some dirt, climb straight up every hill you see, or uncork your obnoxiously loud 4-Stroke then go buy your own property in the middle of no where and have at it. However, if you can’t afford to purchase some property of your own then you’ll be riding on public land or on some private acreage. If that’s the case, then you should treat the land and others that use it with respect. Remember that respect earns respect.

Trail Across a Meadow
Trail Across a Meadow

Simply put, taking the places you ride for granted affects us all. I suspect that in another 10-20 years the land we ride on currently will all but vanish. And honestly, it will be the fault of the vast majority of riders and their failure to follow some simple, common-sense guidelines. Think about it . . . do you want to be “one of those riders” that contributed to a land closure?

See you on the trail!

Kenda Equilibrium: Report #2

Honestly . . . I’ve never owned a Kenda tire. Kyle and some other folks I ride with like them, but I’ve been sticking with IRC and Michelin for many years. The tires that I’ve been using for nearly two decades have been a good balance between performance and longevity.

As noted in the previous report, I was impressed with the Kenda Equilibrium in the first outing. Well the second outing cinched it for me. I’ll have to say that it is just plain awesome! It has most all of the positive features of a trials tire coupled with knobby-type performance when it counts.

 

Kenda After 2 Rides
Kenda After 2 Rides

I hit every side hill trail, tackled some muddy ruts, climbed a couple rocky ledges, even pushed it a little in the grass. In each instance, it did better than I expected. It’s performance on side hills was impressive. Jesse also noted how it excelled in those situations.

Kenda Equilibrium on the Trail
Kenda Equilibrium on the Trail

The next test will be a trip around the Red Bird Crest Trail. A good 75 mile loop should expose any weak points if they do exist. I can see using this tire for all but 2-3 months a year and it could even do well out West. Jesse said he may try using his in Idaho this year, but for there, I’m still inclined to stick with a pure trials tire.

Actually, I liked it so much, that I ordered another one!

See you on the trail!

Red Bird Crest Trail Ride Report (05-25-14)

Well for the first time, Philip tagged along with us to do the Red Bird Crest Trail. He’d ridden a couple portions of it back in 2007 but that was over by the Begley Trailhead and we only hit a few miles of it back then. He’d never done the entire 70+ mile loop.

The crew consisted of Bo, Jesse, Philip, and I. We had intentions of leaving the trailhead @ 10am but after getting our trail passes and so forth it was closer to 10:20 when we pulled onto the trail. This concerned me a bit but I knew that we’d have plenty of daylight if we kept moving and didn’t spend too much time at the store having lunch.

Getting Ready at the Peabody Trailhead
Getting Ready at the Peabody Trailhead

There had been a very windy storm a few days before and I’d heard that schools were closed down that way due to flooding and wind damage. Well I should have considered that before planning our trip. About 1 mile into the trail we came across some LARGE trees on the ground but they’d been recently cut and cleared from the trail. There was fresh sawdust on the ground so I figured the Forest Service had been working hard getting the trail opened up for the Holiday weekend. We made our way onward and each time we’d come to a downed tree it was obvious that someone had been busy clearing the trail.

We’ll that all came to an end just after the Sugar Creek trailhead. We fought our way under a large tree, climbed up the ridge and were greeted with some monster trees blocking the trail. Hmmm . . . maybe we should have ridden somewhere closer to home? Jesse had his hand saw but neither of us brought our little Stihls. Cutting these trees with the hand saw would take hours. So, we started lifting . . . the hard way.

The Hard Way
The Hard Way

So, reluctantly, we moved onward hoping we’d not find many more situations like that one. Things were “Ok” but not great. We didn’t have to do any more “team lifting” across logs but there were dozens of trips up or down the hill from the trail that were necessary to keep us moving forward. If all else failed, we’d get to the store and then ride the road back to the trailhead.

We finally made it to the store and it was about 2PM. If we could maintain the same pace we’d make it around the whole loop but I was still unsure. The owner of the store said that there had been lots of damage along KY66 and ridges above so things could get interesting as the crew pressed forward.

It was certainly good to have some lunch and re-hydrate. As we topped the bikes off with gas, a crew we’d passed early arrived at the store. They said our tracks gave them hope that they too could make it to the store. I chatted with them a bit and learned they were from Indy and were down for the entire weekend. A couple of them knew Trail Rider Charlie which was cool. Jesse took a photo of them at lunch and sent it to Charlie this morning. He said, “They are all too old for me to know them!” Gotta love it. He commented on my cool “Ride or Die” jersey from the High Sierra Motorcycle Club which I have adorned on my last two Red Bird outings.

Lunch at Collett's Store
Lunch at Collett’s Store

My favorite parts of the loop are after the store so the plan was to forge onward until we just couldn’t go any further. It always amazes me how little traffic this portion of the loop actually gets. There are places where it is quad width but essentially it is just one beat down single track path. Few riders make it that far and the rocky ascents and descents keep many of the locals at bay. Philip was bored with the trail before the store but was really enjoying the last sections.

One view I always enjoy seeing the is the power line cut on a ridge that is on the extreme southern portion of the loop. You can see for miles in three directions! Philip was glad we stopped for photos as was Bo. The panoramic view would be even more awesome if those darned power line polls weren’t in the way, however, there wouldn’t be a view at all if the power line cut didn’t exist!

Power Line View
Power Line View

The next stop was where you cross KY66 by the Bear Creek Trailhead. Jesse was ready to bail on us but we talked him into to forging onward to the next bailout point. We were still finding some downed trees but there was always a way around, or at least we made one! There is about 3 miles of gravel and 4 miles of road in this portion of the loop but everyone was a bit tired and welcomed the rest.

I stopped when we arrived at the turn down the hill to the goat trail to see if Jesse was good to go or if he wanted to continue. He stuck with us and was then committed to completing the entire loop. He’d only done that once before so I was glad for him. Plus, he had a hand saw, so I was glad for us!!

I really like these last sections of the loop. They see very little traffic and I like the nice single track sidehill trails. There were a few BIG trees down once again but we found ways up and around each one without eating too much time. Forward progress was essential but based on the timing of things I knew we’d make it around.

We came down the trail to Section 21 and there was a massive tree down right across the entry. It had smashed the trail marker and there was no apparent way around. I sat there for a minute and decided to just take the fire road down to Big Double and back to the trailhead. It was the wise thing to do. About 10 minutes later we arrived back at the Peabody trailhead with no broken bikes or riders. Bo’s odometer showed exactly 73 miles and mine was at 70.53. I explained that was because my Yamaha’s front wheel was off the ground so much more than his KTM.

Another successful and hard fought loop was completed. Not everyone can do it in one day so I feel that it is a worthy accomplishment. Give it try someday if you haven’t made the entire loop. Get some good maps and take along a good guide. It is worth the effort.

See you on the trail!

 

 

Good times . . . Bad times . . . on the Red Bird Crest Trail

This is mostly good, but there is some bad mixed in here and there. It all started with an invite from Charlie to go ride the Red Bird Crest Trail with he and one of his buddies from up in Indy. His friend, Steve, had three other friends from down South (Tennessee, Georgia, Florida) that wanted to tag along as well. Jesse was also able to ride down with me so we end up with 7 guys ready to ride the Red Bird Crest Trail!

A Portion of my Red Bird Crest Trail Map
A Portion of my Red Bird Crest Trail Map

I’ve known Charlie for a while but had only ridden with him once. He is a “more” than capable rider but I had no idea about the rest of the crew. So, I planned to take it easy and not throw in any side ventures or exploring sessions. They wanted to get around the whole loop and that was the goal!

Jesse and I showed up at 9:25am and they were dressed and ready to go! I felt a bit rushed but we got ourselves in order and pulled out to ride a few minutes before 10am. When we left, there was one other truck in the lot with a trailer and I assume there were 3-4 guys riding in their party. Over in the corner by the trail head sign, a man had a nice little camp setup with a tarp, a grill, and so forth. Looked like the same folks that were there last Sunday.

We all settled into a good pace and were making decent time on the trail. No one was having any issues and the group was quick to gather when I stopped. I pulled over when I saw the carsonite sign for Trail Section 4 and waited. Each rider rolled in in regular intervals, but Jesse did not emerge. Charlie leaned his bike against a tree to make some adjustments and everyone took a little break. Then Jesse showed up, but he didn’t look good. A “white shade of gray” would describe it best . . . he’d been hurt. Not good. His foot got caught on a rock or tree or something and rotated his ankle 90 degrees. Ouch! After a few minutes of debate on what to do, he decided to tough it out and get to the store. From there, he could take the road back to the trailhead. He’s tough and kinda stubborn like that.

Onward! Everything went well over the next several miles. We stopped down at the beginning of Section 8 down by Elisha Creek to explain the two alternate routes. There was a steep uphill that leads to a rocky, rooty, nasty climb but emerges on a nice wide and easy fire road. The other (easier) option was a gradual climb up to the ridge and some wide jeep width type trail to a juncture and marker for Section 8. Charlie and I hit the hard hill and the others followed Jesse up the main trail We gathered at metal sign marker for Section 8 and the last three that showed up had seen a bear run cross the trail! Cool stuff!

The plan was to skip Section 9 and head on down the road directly to the store. We were running a bit late but I really wanted to get around the whole thing. We ate a quick lunch and then got back on the trail. Jesse took some ibuprofen and headed back to the trailhead on the blacktop.

I really like the sections after the Collett’s Store and before the road crossing at the southern point on KY66. You climb up to a long ridge and then ride along it forever. At one point you hit an opening below a power line cut and you can see for miles in both directions. I always try to stop and get some photos here.

Red Bird Crest Trail Overlook
Red Bird Crest Trail Overlook

More Photos from the Red Bird Crest Trail

With little time to spare, we headed on down the ridge and finally dropped down to KY66 at the southern trailhead.

The Trials Tire Debacle

I’ve been a huge proponent of Trials Tires for trail riding since 2008. The guys I rode with out West insisted that I mount a trials tire before heading to Idaho. Their suggestion was spot on and I’ve been hooked ever since. Generally, I start using a trials tire in April or May and won’t take it off until the ground freezes in the fall. I only buy one rear knobby tire a year now, that’s it. Using Tire Balls eliminates the need to change tires frequently. However, what I’ve been through over the past several days has been interesting . . .

Tire Ball (1109)
Tire Ball (1109)

About three weeks ago I ordered a Michelin Trials Competition Tire. The one and only trials tire I have ever used. It came in to the shop and the list price was almost $280!! Geez, they’ve really gone up in price!! But then we looked closely and it was a Radial. On top of that we learned that Michelin discontinued the non-radial version I’d been using for years. Oh, more $$, but surely the “radial” makes it better. Right?

So I finally get around to mounting it late last week. It goes very well, but I note the tire is much heavier than the older one and it has a stiffer sidewall. I surmised that this was due to the “radial” design and the description did say that the sidewalls were stiffer. When the mounting was done, I tightened down the rim lock and aired it up. It popped right onto the rim and all was good. Or so I thought. I cleaned up the mess and put away my tools and then looked over at the tire changing stand and saw that it wasn’t beaded up on the rim. I applied more air, and it popped back on the rim. 5 minutes later, it was off again.

The next evening I took it off and added another ball. Same result. So I added yet another. Same result. One more time and three more balls than normal. Nope, it came off again and if it had stayed on the number of balls made the tire to stiff overall. Not good.

My next idea was to get the Michelin Trials X Light tire. It is supposed to weigh less and be more supple than the Trials Competition Radial. So it arrives, and guess what? It is a Radial too. Hmmm. I go through the routine once again and get it mounted. No issues. Unfortunately, it won’t stay seated. I took it off and added two more balls but it felt like maybe it was too many. Oh well, I stuffed it on the rim and aired it up. It seated and stayed seated! Next, I put it on the bike and rode it around the yard for 5 minutes. Parked the bike and looked down to see it had come unseated. Argh!

 

IRC Trial Winner
IRC Trial Winner

At this point I’m convinced this is all due to the “Radial” design. Then I remembered that Jesse had an IRC Trial Winner in his garage. Brand New! Philip went to pick it up and upon arrival I quickly determine it too is a RADIAL! Here we go again.

But, I dive in and give it another try. I’m getting really tired of the Tire Balls right now. They are a pain to deal with but I’m fairly efficient at the whole process. Normally, I only change tires and balls 2-3 times year. I’ve now done it 8 times in the last week alone.

This time it works. I could almost tell that it would when I got the first side of the tire on the rim and started to work it down to start on the second side. Something was different. The IRC Trial Winner went on well, but just a bit tougher than the Michelins. Regardless, it stayed seated. It stayed seated all night long and I’ve ridden with it on for about 20 minutes and all seems well.

The Line Up
The Line Up

So I laid out the Michelin Trials X Light Radial, the Michelin Trials Competition Radial, and an old Michelin Trials Competition Non-Radial on the driveway. I inserted a tape measure into the Trials X Light and it was just over 4″ deep. The Trials Competition Radial was just a small bit under 4″ and guess what . . . the old Non-Radial was only 3.5 inches deep. That is the issue!!! I didn’t measure the IRC before I put it on but I bet it is closer to 3.5 than the Michelin tires.

You learn something new everyday!

See you on the trail!

The Copperhead Run

The next KORHS event will be on May 19th at the Copperhead Run in Wolfe County, Kentucky. We named it Copperhead Run for a reason and the fact that it is located in the Eastern portion of the state means that the terrain is different from where most of our events are staged. The soil is more sandy, the pines are more abundant, and the undergrowth is thicker. All of those features combined with a large flat area that was strip mined over 3 decades ago make for an awesome venue (and a great place for Copperheads to hang out).

Arrowing the Course
Arrowing the Course

The course begins on the flat strip site and winds between the pines but racers are riding on natural terrain within 3/4 mile or so. The next 4.5 miles is a really nice single track trail through typical Eastern Kentucky mountain terrain. Lots of little elevation changes and a mix of hardwoods and conifers keep the trail fun and interesting. There are plenty places to pass though, and I’m sure some new lines will open up as the race wears on. You won’t find this type of trail anywhere in the central or western parts of Kentucky so enjoy it.

Copperhead Run Trail Work
Copperhead Run Trail Work

Racers exit this more natural terrain and drop into an area along the fringes of the old strip mine. This area has an interesting surface as it is where the overburden from the mine was pushed downhill. Lots of little ups and downs between the pines. The course transitions to the flat mined out area around mile marker 5 and flows nicely through the pines for another 1.5 miles.

Below are three links to some video clips of the 2013 Course:

http://youtu.be/vIUoya9Wr0s

http://youtu.be/O9OY8smPDuM

http://youtu.be/EeYzXcEUkgg

The course was a hit in 2012 with most all the KORHS Racers and they’ll love the extra mileage and widened trails in 2013.

See you on the Trail!

The 123 Mile Thanksgiving Holiday!

My Thanksgiving Holiday was a good one this year. We had a great dinner at home on Wednesday with just the immediate family. I cooked the entire traditional dinner and it was judged by my family to be the best they had this year. On Thanksgiving Day we went to Kim’s parents for dinner with her family. It was a good time. I learned that my bow and arrow skills are lacking. But that is another story . . .

On Tuesday before Thanksgiving, Roger and I rode for a while and got in about 27 miles. Good riding! We covered some new territory and I hit every goat trail except one. Always a good time! The ground was actually very dry but the thick cover of leaves made things a bit sketchy at times. We couldn’t have asked for better weather and riding any day is always great!

Deciduous Leaves Covering the Ground
Deciduous Leaves Covering the Ground

We also planned to ride the day after Thanksgiving as well. But this time, down at Red Bird. I hadn’t been for several months now but it was time to check it out. Four of us headed out at 9:30AM and it was only about 38 degrees and cloudy. The trail was once again covered with leaves and we were the first crew out that morning from the trailhead.

Fall Trail Clearing

Now that we’re done on course work for the year, we can concentrate on having a little fun. Clearing some trails, exploring new areas, and a trip to Red Bird are all in store this fall and winter. I try to get out every weekend regardless of the weather.

Chain Saw on the YZ
Chain Saw on the YZ

This year I’m packing my little Stihl on the YZ and it has come in handy several times. I cleared two sections on the Goat Trail and another large one across an old logging road below a ridge line trail. Having that little saw at-hand makes you re-think whether you can “get there” or not. Jesse hasn’t even offered to carry the one in his backpack.

Fall Trail Work
Fall Trail Work

It’s nice out this fall and everyone should get out and take advantage of it. I know it is slick, the leaves cover up all the stuff that will jerk you front wheel away, and the temperatures are getting colder but it is a great time of year to ride! It’ll improve your skill level if you learn from your mistakes.

I heard recently that some of the last sections of Red Bird were not heavily used and it was hard to push your way through. If you got an early start, it would be possible to get around it all but getting through that last section when it is late isn’t good. You’re on the wrong side of the ridge and it gets dark over there a bit early. Need to go down there before the days get much shorter.

Get out and ride!

See you on the trail!

 

No time for fun . . .

No more “fun” days of riding for a while. It’s time to focus on getting courses ready for the 2012 season. The last two weekends have been dedicated to cutting in new trail for the Sawmill event. So far, so good. I think it will most likely be close to 10.5 or 11 miles this year and the vast majority of it is high and dry!

Course Work
Course Work

Not that working on courses isn’t fun, because it is in its own way. It’s certainly not as fun as a great day of riding at Red Bird, but being outdoors and enjoying nature is part of the experience as well. We’ve learned to read the terrain and know how soils types will hold up during a certain type of event. Additionally, we also take pride in what we do. It’s always nice to get some good feedback after an event.

But for now, each weekend will be dedicated to this activity. I’m not a person who can wait until the last minute to get something accomplished and people who do wait until the last minute to lay out a course normally fail miserably. You just can’t do it well in a couple weekends. The effort involved is much greater than that even if there is a course already on the property. Few will ever understand . . . but that’s Ok.

See you on the trail!